Aphasia

a·pha·sia is the loss of ability to understand or express speech, caused by brain damage.
Aphasia gets in the way of a person’s ability to use or understand words. Aphasia does not impair the person’s intelligence. People who have aphasia may have difficulty speaking and finding the “right” words to complete their thoughts. They may also have problems understanding conversation, reading and comprehending written words, writing words, and using numbers.

Severe aphasia limits the person’s ability to communicate. The person may say little and may not participate in or understand any conversation.
This part of the diagnosis is hard to take in also.  Having non-verbal boys and having to learn their needs and wants when they cant tell you, is very stressful.  You never know where they are hurting and you have to play the guessing game and hope and pray you get the answer right. Most of the time, I nail it! From the facial expressions to body movements, you find your own way of figuring it all out. We do communicate through sign language.  I have adapted their communication to their needs and that’s how we roll!    I teach friends, family, church, and professionals on a daily basis so when they talk, Our boys would understand.  It is such an amazing feeling when they catch on to signs and can share back with you their thoughts. So, when you think there is no way out of the situation their is always something you can learn or adapt to in a way that they can understand. Don’t give up!

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